Sarah McKee Davis

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name Sarah McKee Davis
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birth_name Sarah McKee
birth_date September 22 1799
birth_place Mount Pleasant, PA
death_date Interwiki: Death date and age 1888022017990922++
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resting_place Brigham City Cemetery
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Sarah McKee Davis was born ::September 22, 1799, in ::Mountain Pleasant, Pennsylvania, to Joseph McKee, a physician, and Jane Young. Sarah became a skilled nurse and midwife working alongside her father. In later years, she would be known as “Dr. Davis.”
When Sarah was 23 years old, she married William Davis on October 3, 1822. Sarah and William would have 10 children.
In December 1832, the couple joined the Mormon Church and moved to Ohio to be closer to other church members. In the intervening years, they lived in a number of places, including Nauvoo where they became acquainted with Mormon Prophet Joseph Smith and his brother Hyrum. The brothers were murdered in 1844. Following their deaths, Sarah and William emigrated to Utah. They settled in Box Elder, later renamed Brigham City.
While William was busy with others constructing the Davis Fort, which would be their home for awhile, Sarah picked wild berries and Sego lilies for food. She also picked the fluff from cattails to fill bed ticks.
Sarah delivered many babies and cared for the sick in Box Elder. When a patient insisted on paying her, Sarah replied, “Do you think I do this for pay? Don’t you know I do it because I love you?”
On Feb. 20, 1888, Sarah passed away.

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