William Davis

“Notes”
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name William Davis
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birth_date April 12 1795
birth_place Unity, PA
death_date Interwiki: Death date and age 1883112217950412++
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resting_place Brigham City Cemetery
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spouse Sarah McKee Davis
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William Davis was the first white man to make his home in Brigham City. He explored the area for the first time in 1850 at the request of Mormon President Brigham Young and returned the following year with his family and a few friends to live. Finally, after years of religious persecution while living in Ohio, Missouri, and Illinois, the Davis family was looking forward to a new life among people with similar beliefs.
Even though Brigham City was considered dangerous territory because of the Shoshone Indians, William earned their respect and they called him “The Captain.”
The Indians weren’t the only strangers William befriended. Because he had an easy disposition and was jovial and good-natured, he had many acquaintances among non-Mormons while living in the East. One evening before a mob was going to attack the Mormon settlement where William lived, some of the leaders of the mob sent a lady ahead to tell him “…you will be unmolested, and all you have to do is burn the Book of Mormon and declare Joseph Smith is a fallen prophet, and you will escape….” William told her the mob would have his answer when they arrived. When they reached William’s home, the family was gone and never returned.
William was a blacksmith and a farmer during his lifetime. He died on ::November 22, 1883.

Notes


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