Simon L. Moskowitz

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An unlikely addition to medical practice in Brigham City was Dr. Simon L. Moskowitz, a Jewish doctor who was born in Romania in 1908, emigrated through Ellis Island in 1913, and grew up in New York City. He graduated from high school at 16, then from college, after which he and his wife went “west” where he attended medical school in Omaha, Nebraska, and finished his internship around 1933 or 1934.Anne Moskowitz Dolowitz “The CCC Camp” in Eileen Hallett Stone, Editor., A Homeland in The West, Utah Jews Remember, University of Utah Press, Salt Lake City, UT, 2001, 405-412.
This was the height of the depression, and he signed on with the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) and was sent to Council Bluffs, Iowa, then to southern Utah, then to Box Elder, where he was CCC camp doctor and also allowed to have private patients. The couple “fell in love” with the west and the people of Brigham City. so he opened a private practice circa 1938 following his separation from the CCC.
When Pearl Harbor was bombed Dr. Moskowitz volunteered for the Army and served in India, China, and Burma. Upon his return he purchased a little house at 124 West Forest and had it remodeled for his office, from which he conducted a full medical practice locally until the early 1980s. The family built “the house of their dreams” on North Main where the highway turns west, and named it “Wit’s End.” He moved to Arizona and continued to practice part time until his death in 1989.Anne Moskowitz Dolowitz, email communication with Sarah Yates, February 19, 2013.

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