John Johnson

“Notes”
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name John Johnson
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birth_name Jorgen Jorgensen
birth_date September 20 1812
birth_place Liseleje, Denmark
death_date Interwiki: Death date and age 1896022118120920++
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resting_place Brigham City Cemetery
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John Johnson was born in West Maria Sogn on the Isle of ::Bornholm, Denmark. His father died when he was four years old. Three years later John became a herd boy for his grandfather to help support his mother and siblings.
When John was a young man, he was asked to take care of the property owned by Karen Olson, a widow with four children. John and Karen fell in love and were married. The farm prospered under John’s management, and he traded it for a larger farm in 1836. This farm was sold for a profit in 1839.
The Johnsons joined the Mormon Church in June 8, 1853. Because of religious persecution, primarily by relatives, they decided to come to Utah. Even though John only received $8,000 for the sale of his farm – it was worth three times that amount – he gave it all to the church to help members emigrate to Utah. When the Johnsons arrived in Brigham City, they were $8 in debt. Church members shared their provisions with them.
John acquired some land in the winter of 1855, and in the spring planted his first crop. It failed. Eventually he was successful in growing hemp and was asked to manage the Co-op’s rope-making department. John continued to prosper, and each year from 1860 to 1869 he sent one yoke of oxen back to Missouri to bring emigrants to Utah. John passed away on ::February 21, 1896.

Notes


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