Adolph Madsen

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name Adolph Madsen
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order 4th
office Mayor of Brigham City
term_start March 24, 1883
term_end March 21, 1891
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predecessor Samuel Smith
successor Joseph M. Jenson
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birth_date Aug 13 1841
birth_place Denmark
death_date Interwiki: Death date and age1924041218410813++
death_place Brigham City
restingplace = Brigham City Cemetery – http://www.namesinstone.com/ViewMap.aspx?deceasedId 342976
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spouse Mary Wagner
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Adolph Madsen began his first of three terms in 1883. His annual salary was $50, and he was allowed an additional $25 for other services rendered. That year, a lamp and hitching post were erected in front of the post office near the courthouse.
When Mayor Madsen was elected to his second term of office, municipal candidates were still unopposed. The Deseret News of March 4, 1885 reported: “There has just been an election for City officers, at which most of the old officers were returned. There was no opposition candidate and by light vote.” During Madsen’s second term, the square across from the Tabernacle was fenced and landscaped, city streets were partially graded, and a town clock was purchased for $433.15 and installed in the Courthouse tower.
In his third term, the City bought a funeral coach for $355. S.N. Lee was the driver and caretaker of the coach and the horses that pulled it. The hearse was available, free of charge, to all Brigham City citizens. Submission of a petition protesting “cattle running at large in the streets” resulted in the City Council enforcing the stray-cattle ordinance.

Biography

Because Nels and Mary Madsen were industrious and poor, they expected their young son Adolph to complete chores at home and then seek other work on the island of Lolland, Denmark. Adolph’s first job was herding geese.
The family joined the Mormon Church in 1854. Among their new church acquaintances was a young man who was in love, but afraid to pursue the girl because his clothes were ragged. With Nels’ consent, Mary gave him the Prince Albert suit her husband had worn when he courted her. The young man and the girl were eventually married. The girl’s brother, who was wealthy, later repaid this kindness by giving the Madsen family enough money to leave Denmark.
In May 1857, Nels and Mary set sail for America – unknowingly without Adolph. He was still exploring the wharf. The next morning a small steamer reunited Adolph with his parents.
After the family arrived in the United States, they worked a number of jobs to complete their journey to Utah and then Brigham City. In 1883, Adolph was elected Mayor of Brigham City. He served three terms.
The work ethic Adolph learned as a youth was invaluable when he received a “missionary call” to haul rock for the new Salt Lake Temple. Thirty years later, Adolph was asked to serve as Second Assistant to Mormon President Lorenzo Snow in the temple he helped build.
: Government
: People

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